Dan Lund – Patent Attorney, President

Dan Lund brings enthusiasm and creativity to protecting the intellectual property of his clients. His favorite aspects of his practice include expanding his understanding of cutting-edge technologies and collaborating with clients to develop strategies that best support their business objectives within the constraints of their budget. Through his career as a patent attorney, Dan has regularly worked with Fortune 500 companies and small inventors in developing and carrying out their intellectual property strategies. Dan has extensive experience prosecuting U.S. and international patent applications as well as supporting foreign counsel to secure patents outside the United States.

Dan has a deep commitment to public service, currently serving as mayor of Newport, Minnesota, a first ring suburb of St. Paul. In this role, he welcomes new ideas and diverse opinions in order to help governmental bodies to improve their services and efficiency.

Dan Lund

Contact Dan

 +1 651 968 0800
  +1 651 331 9324
 lund@lundip.com

    Education

J.D., University of Minnesota Law School 2004
cum laude, Minnesota Intellectual Property Review Journal

B.S., Michigan Technological University 2002
magna cum laude, Mechanical Engineering, Michigan Space Grant Consortium Fellow

   Admissions

    Services

  • Patents
  • Due Diligence
  • Opinions
  • Strategic Counseling
  • Licensing and Dispute Resolution

    Industries

  • Consumer Products
  • Electrical and Computer Technology
  • Encryption and encoding
  • Manufacturing
  • Medical Devices
  • Software
  • Telecommunications

    In the Media

  • Vote on the future of Newport (South Washington County Bulletin, 2016) Washington County's plan to bring 1000+ new residents to Newport without any increase in the tax base is a bad deal for current residents.
  • A $2 million discount (St. Paul Pioneer Press, 2015) Ramsey and Washington Counties' $24.4 million purchase of the resource derived fuel plant in Newport, a money-hemorrhaging operation in a soon-to-be extinct industry, is not only a terrible deal for taxpayers, but is a net loss for the environment.